Families in Calgary, Family Activities, Lifestyle, Lifestyle Design, Nature and Forest Play, Outdoors Activities

Winter Activity Ideas for Families (and Christmas, too!)

When we first moved to Canada, we were amazed by the snow, and very quickly became acquainted with frost bite, frozen eyelashes and all sorts of other classic Canadiana childhood moments.  25 years later, we haven’t lost our love of this magical season.  

And 25 years later, I still hold to the philosophy that if you are going to live in a country where winter runs from October to May (we had snow in September this year) – well, you might as well learn to love it, right?

I bring to you a list of really fun things to do as a family in winter.

First, go on a Christmas decoration hunt!  Print off this PDF I made for you and have the kids cross off each item when they see it!  We grab hot chocolates (and peppermint mochas for the parents of course) and it’s a fun evening! 

Pick up some toboggans and google toboggan hills in your area.  In Calgary check out the brilliant toboggan ‘bowl’ in Mapleridge, just off Acadia Drive.  In Canmore, the toboggan hill at the Canmore Nordic Centre.  

Watch the Grinch (Jim Carrey version) and have popcorn doused in butter. Or, grab a bag of that DELICIOUS Boom-Chicka-Pop peppermint popcorn.  Don’t forget to put mint lindtor chocolates in the freezer.  A christmas classic! 

Play Christmas light bingo.  Grab a happy meal, and drive around locating different christmas lights and decorations.  

Try making Maple Taffy in the snow.

Build a Gingerbread House

Make Christmas ornaments with supplies from the loonie store – pipe cleaner christmas ornaments with beads strung on them, popsicle stick snowflakes with jewels stuck on, there are so many options!

Bake some cupcakes or cookies, have the kids decorate them and take them to an elderly neighbour. 

In Calgary, go skating on Bowness Lagoon (North), Olympic Oval (Central) or Spruce Meadows (South) – feeling ambitous?  Skate on Grotto pond just before Canmore. 

Make a bird feeder with a pinecone, honey and wild bird seeds.  Even better, in Calgary go to Fish Creek and find the chickadees.  Curious, friendly and very happy to flitter onto your arm. 

Print off 12 days of kindness cards and divvy among the family.  Each day, a family member does something kind, writes it on the back of their card, and puts it into a kindness jar.  It is a lovely ritual to read all of them out. 

 Make hot mulled wine, and go out for a winter walk with it in your coffee mug (not for the kids lol)

Have a winter time charcuterie picnic.  Ice wine, cheese, bread, crackers, meats and some nice dried fruits.  Don’t forget the blanket and snow pants 🙂

Fill squirt bottles with food colouring, and set up snow in a container for the kids to colour.  They can also ‘colour’ their snowmen. 

Make Poppycock and then try not to eat it all. 

Visit Santa at the shopping centre.  In Calgary, you can decorate a gingerbread cookie and watch a disney movie as well!

Write letters to Santa, go on a forest walk and hang them in the tree.  Replace them with Candy Canes so that the kids find them on the return walk.

Make Pinecone christmas ornaments with glitter glue and sequins, tie with a twine and hang in the tree. 

Go outside with a black cloth and look at snowflakes up close.

Sleep under the christmas tree!

Have a family photo shoot – in the winter!

Make an extravagant breakfast.  Waffles, pancakes, fruit – or perhaps german style with fresh bread, meats and cheeses. 

Take ALL of the pillows off the couches and make the best.pillow.fort.ever.  

Get walnuts and a nut cracker (for the older kids) and consume half your body weight in nuts by the end of the night. 

Make a frame out of twigs in the snow and make a scene using twigs, berries, pine cones, leaves, etc. 

Attend an event where carols are sung.  

Make smores on a fire pit or in your own living room.  Another option:  Roast Chestnuts.

Go to the library and pick up winter and christmas books. 

Mix up and sprinkle “Reindeer dust” on the snow on Christmas eve.

Dance to christmas songs

Watch Home Alone, of course!

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Crafts, Family Activities, Nature and Forest Play

Nature Crafts and Christmas Crafts for Toddlers and Young Children, Christmas Pinecone Ornaments

As christmas approaches, I have been thinking about how to combine getting outside with the kiddos in nature, and christmas crafts.  Today I present to you a wonderful craft activity that is suitable for ages 2+ – I will warn you, glitter is involved…

Supplies: 

Pine Cones, preferably gathered out in the beautiful fresh winter air, which will get you and your children outside and ideally in a forest.  the act of looking for and gathering pine cones is a wonderful mindfulness-based activity.

Get out there in the forest!

Glitter Glue and Sequins: 

+1 for Crayola glitter glue, I’ve tried lots of type and this stuff washes off of clothes great! 
I like this set of crayola brushes, the two bigger ones are great for crafts with glue, the two smaller better for painting.
I like this set of crayola brushes, the two bigger ones are great for crafts with glue, the two smaller better for painting.

With craft time I prefer to let my kids freely design, the younger (3) is a big glitter bomb and the older (5) did cool little blobs to make it look like christmas ornaments.

When you are finished, simply tie with cooking twine or ribbon that you have on hand! 

Crafts, Kids Activities, Nature and Forest Play

Nature Crafts for Children and Toddlers – Autumn Leaf Wreaths for Kids

Up here in Canada, the days are touched with the cool air of autumn and we’ve even had our first snow (!) which says to me, beautiful autumn is going to be a quick one this year!

I wanted to share one of my favourite autumn crafts today.  I am passionate about nature-based crafts that get the kids outside.

This craft checks the box for getting them outside, out gathering all sorts of things, and it is also educational in that you can talk about colours. Also, they get to glue things.  If you are a toddler parent you know that anything sensory is a WIN!

So I present to you, fall autumn leaf wreaths.  By the way, this is a craft that costs nothing to do unless you need glue and pens!

Supplies:  -An old cardboard box, cut into a wreath shape and cut out some leaf shapes.

-Pens

-Glue

The best part of all of this is getting the kids outside to gather leaves, sticks, pinecones or whatever else they would like for their wreath!

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When you return from your walk with your bounty of autumnul goodies, have your kiddos separate the items by colour or sort them while you cut out a round wreath shape  and a few leaf shapes from any old cardboard you have kicking around (diaper boxes are great for this)

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Next, add some colours to the wreath and create some ‘leaves’ with pens!

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And then, the part they’ve been waiting for… GLUEING.  Kids love this stuff.

And eventually, you will have the sweetest little wreath (my kids added “icycles” since their nature walk involved picking leaves out of the snow!)

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Families in Calgary, Kids Activities, Lifestyle Design, Nature and Forest Play, Toddler Gear

Toddler Mountain Bike Parks in Calgary – Fish Creek Mountain Bike Skills Park


Toddler fun in calgaryNot far from where we live is the Fish Creek Mountain Bike Skills Park (here is a map for the location)  and a description of the features on Trail Forks.

Don’t be mistaken, this bike park isn’t just for the big kids and adults.  This park is absolutely amazing for toddlers on balance bikes, as well!  It has been a wonderful (free) place for our family to get outside and play on our bikes for the last few seasons.

There is a dedicated beginner’s oval track for toddlers and small children to get used to it. We found that with both of our kids on striders, they preferred to walk up and ride down the hills on the pump track, so the oval is nice for them to go and do that at their own pace.

On the main pump track, you’ll find yourself trying to encourage them to move, to keep the bike traffic flowing if there are others there. And we all know how well a toddler takes to being told what to do 😉

There are a variety of features, and it is well spread out. The CMBA has a great little blurb on how to use the track, the terminology, and tips on skills such as how to get through a pump track, or around the berms.  The park itself is great for people like me – a mama of 2 toddlers and a baby whose eyes are usually darting around frantically like a mother chicken watching her 20 babies. They can’t go too far, and the parking lot ,as you can see in the photo below, is close by when you have to surfboard carry your toddler that doesn’t want to go home.  Excellent.

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It is located in South East Calgary, about 10 minutes from South Centre Mall and just a few km from Annie’s Cafe and the Bow Valley Ranche.

I highly recommend going over to Annie’s in the summer for ice cream afterward if it’s a hot day 🙂 It has a beautiful native garden, art installations and lots of places for the kids to explore while you sip coffee leisurely.  It’s a hugely popular spot so there’s always little friends to make.  Ah, toddler life, when you are up and out for the day at 8am because you’ve already been up for 2 hours….

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Photo Credit:  Calgary Mountain Bike Alliance (CMBA)

Interestingly, this park has been in the works for some time (15 years!) and for  a long time, there was strong resistance (and the belief that it wasn’t doable) at the Provincial *and* Municipal levels in Calgary, even as other parks were being built, such as Chestermere and Canmore.  This really surprised me, because I’ve always thought of Calgary as progressive and outdoor-activity oriented.

Once people retired, management changed over, etc. the project came to fruition thanks to the dedicated work and persistence of several advocates and the CMBA.

And did you know there are plans to put another park in at Glenmore Resevoir?!  Exciting!  $150k has been raised and about another $125k to go.

This park needs volunteer hours, material and equipment to continue finishing the development of it, especially the NW corner.  You can email the Calgary Mountain Bike Alliance if you’d like to contribute in any way you can! bikepark@cmbalink.com

Go have fun!

 

xo
Carina

Baby Gear, Nature and Forest Play, Toddler Gear

Great Water Bottles for Toddler Hikes, Toddler Hiking Water Bottles, Toddler Water Bottles, No-Spill Cups for Toddlers

We are having a baby girl!

I’ve gone through so many brands of water bottles for my kids, today I thought I’d share some of my favourites.  For us I prefer lightweight, that fits in the side of my own backpack mesh pockets, and I HATE dealing with too many parts (tommy teepee cups, I’m looking at you!)

These are the ones that have lasted “toddler life” and preschool, and hikes (and being carried by mum and dad!) and have minimal parts!

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The Nalgene Grip & Gulp – This one is pressure controlled and releases water as they sip.  This is $10.75 on Amazon Prime. In Sport Chek, etc. they are usually around $14.00

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The Camelbak Eddy Kids Bottle – This one features a straw that the kids can flip back and forth (which they love – this is their favourite out of all of the bottles)  These are $12.00 and available on Amazon Prime.  For the most part they are about $15 in stores in YYC.  Sometimes you can get great deals on them ($11) in Winners .

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For the house, I really like the Munchkin Miracle 360 cups. These are spill proof and again, pressure controlled with sipping.  These are what my kids use by their bedside tables.   These are $17 on Amazon Prime.  I acutally don’t see these often in the stores here, I think we inherited one from a friend and LOVED it and wound up buying more.

These are Amazon Affiliate Links, but these are all what I purchase myself (and the prices are better on Amazon.) By clicking on the links to do any shopping on Amazon you are helping support this blog!

I try to keep my lists helpful and not overwhelming.  I’d rather just hear about the top 2-3 options rather than sixteen billion, and I’ll only recommend things we use ourselves! 🙂  So there you go!

Baby Gear, Families in Calgary, Happiness, Kids Activities, Lifestyle, Lifestyle Design, Nature, Nature and Forest Play, Outdoors Activities

Hiking Heart Creek Trail with Toddlers – Toddler-Friendly Hikes in Calgary and Canmore.

Heart Creek Trail with 2 toddlers and a baby 🙂 

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Today my husband and I rolled out of the house with our two toddlers (4 and 3) and baby (1) to finally go do Heart Creek Trail.  We haven’t done any hikes yet this summer, but we’ve heard about this trail on lots of family outdoors groups.

We find that with hiking, we HAVE to commit, get up and go.  It really takes commitment – no changing minds.  It honestly takes a bit of dedication, because so many things can happen in the 2 hours between the kids up at 6:30 and getting rolling at 8:30. Meltdowns, complications, distractions or just the weakening of our own willpower to get in the car and drive for an hour and a half! 🙂

One thing that I am constantly fighting in order to get to the mountains, is the urge to leave the house in a somewhat not-disastrous-state. It’s quite a state after morning wild animal feedings 🙂

I work so hard not to feel it but my house IS messier than the average house and I full disclosure, I am still working to shake off  shame about it (which is hard to do when you do get judged and it reactivates your shame.) I constantly feel the need to clean it before we go.  Which is silly, because even if I do clean it, my ‘clean’ is still messy to other people, so what’s the point? lol.

I had been succumbing to the urge to clean earlier in the summer and finding that I was using my best energy and best time of day to clean and “organize” – basically, more often than not, it would wind up resulting in us not getting out!  So stupid when it’s not even a value of mine, I’m just doing it because of long-held shame and fear of judgement.

So, for the second half of summer, I’m pretty much leaving the house a disaster, saying fuck that and going to the mountains!  This is a belief that is no longer serving me.

We try to get everyone up, snacks packed, everyone changed, stuff thrown in a bag and coffees ready for us. Almost always, somewhere along the line we usually forget a coat, or a pair of extra pants, or someone’s water bottle, but if it means getting up and out, we can roll with that 🙂

Now, with out out of the way, onto the fun part – Heart Creek Trail, it is toddler approved (4,3,1)

Heart Creek is ideal for age 3+

Under 3’s will get tuckered so have a mode of carrying if they do!

I am pretty adventurous with my BoB Stroller and Double Chariot Stroller, however, I’ll say that Heart Creek is *not* doable with a stroller.

However, there are lots of natural features to keep the toddlers going!  You start off with a very slight toddler-friendly ascent up a hill (top left photo), over rooty, rocky trail for about 10 minutes before the trail opens to a nice meadow and view of Heart Mountain.  From there on in, you follow the creek, where there are fun bridges criss-crossing the creek, a toddler-friendly crossing where they step over slabs of rock, and trail mostly consisting of loose and compacted river rocks and pebbles.

Despite the bear in area signs, it was a busy trail on a Sunday in July, but not overly busy.

We turned around at the climbing area (75% of the way) as our parent spidey senses were tingling and we sensed the kids were getting tired. It wound up being a good judgment call.  Always turn around before meltdowns, and leave something more to look forward to the next time.  That’s kind of our approach to hiking now.

I think in our earlier parent days we were adamant about completing the whole hike or trail and we’d always wind up carrying someone back to the car or dealing with meltdowns.

We’ve learned to let that mindset go and simply go for the experiences on the trail, rather than where the trail leads to, or the “accomplishment” inherent in a hike.  It takes a bit of work to pull back and turn around before you are ready to, but it makes for a better experience for everyone!

 


Tips to keep your toddlers going on a hike:


-Snacks


-Point out cool features (lots of mushrooms on your right, on the first part of the hike – keep your eye out for the cute pink ones!)


-Don’t see at it as getting to a destination – look at it as a chance to explore and play in different features along the trail. We loved the little creek crossings on the rocks as well as the bridges.

-Make nature bracelets so they can pick things along the way! Still have to write a post about this, but essentially, make a bracelet out of duct tape, with the sticky side up.  As your kids hike, they can add little things to their bracelets like leaves, moss, twigs and the occasional wildflower. 

-Scale it.  Remember they are little people in little bodies.  We really had to work on getting out of our “goal of completing a hike because we drove an hour there” mindset and focus on the experiences along the way on the trail.  Ironically, this is a really nice analogy for life. 🙂

If you enjoy reading about trails on blogs, here are some blogs about Heart Creek Trail written by other wonderful bloggers!  These are always what inspire me to get out there!

Other blogs on Heart Creek Trail & Area

I love the Hiking with Barry blog, he’s a lovely guy and sold me my XC skis last year! Here’s his blog on Heart Creek Trail 

Tanya scrambled up Heart Mountain (sans kids you can make it a great scramble / summit hike!)

Here’s the standard All Trails Heart Creek Trail Map

With or without kids, if you complete Heart Creek and still want more, why not do Bow Valley Nuclear Bunker after lunch and explore the man made cave inside?  (take a flashlight, it’s pretty cool and starts from the same area as Heart Creek!) 

Crafts, Essays, Etsy, Happiness, Life Hacks, Nature and Forest Play, Physical Wellness, The Projects, Trail running, weight loss

How to Have a Great Maternity Leave: The 70% Secret in Goal Setting + Running

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Goal setting and achievement is an area I thrive in.  It’s my jam.  I study the most successful people and apply their perspectives and mindsets.  It’s what I do in my career.  I help clients – especially athletes – with their goal setting.

You can get to a goal via a “tough” mindset but what I’ve observed over 3000 hours of coaching, is that it burns people out and drains willpower.

My focus with the high achiever types often isn’t getting things done, it comes down to longevity and sustainability for them and helping them reconnect with their “why.”

I know lots of high achiever types who use intense pressure, self criticism, and high expectations.  It works in the short run, but has longer term consequences. In high performance athletes, for example, I see a loss of life balance, strange injuries and illnesses come up, highs and lows in their performance, and other segments of their life fall out of balance.  There’s negative ripple effects all over the place.

I was fascinated, and started self-experimenting with goal setting approaches..

I write about all sorts of things on the GML with all sorts of approaches, including the one below, because I want you to be exposed to lots of ideas and different types of thinking. Some will work for you.  Some won’t. Here’s a fascinating alternative approach to goal setting and running.

** Slack off***

No human being hits 100% of their goals in all areas of their lives.  It’s not possible.  It would be a different world if everyone could achieve their goals.

Whenever I coach and work with my clients, my high achievers often have the most difficulty.  They get to their goals, but struggle with longevity, generating energy and willpower.  They’re quite tough on themselves. Shooting for 100% and expecting 100% the whole way.  Their mind is blown when I tell them they can get the same results with a 70% mindset.

I like 70%.  It’s a really nice number.

BUT.

But there’s such negative connotations with 70%.  In University my students are hard on themselves with a 70%.  It’s a B- or C+ in some classes.  It’s never good enough.  Everyone’s always going for the A+.  It’s always all or nothing with goal setting. To move into the 70% place is not all or nothing, it is good enough, but a fascinating thing happens, 70% seems to launch them into the stratosphere. 70% is about accumulating wins what makes it very easy to put the extra 30% in.

think about your own mindset around 70% in anything.   What were you taught to think about 70%?  For example, what was your family’s response if you bought home a 70% on something?  You got that score on some kind of assessment?

What would happen if you backed off from 100% to 70% in something you are working toward, and got away from your all-or-nothing mindset?

I tried this out with my running.  And guess what?

You experience a powerful shift in your drive.  You stop relying on willpower (not good,) and start using the power of memory and gratitude to drive your motivation because you have the time and space (since you’re only going at 70%) to engage in gratitude based practices.

I set a rather ridiculous goal for myself on 1st mat leave. Rather than run a 10k I decided to jump out of a helicopter and run 21k down a mountain.  That still makes me laugh.  That was the old all-or-nothing mindset.

I started training, knowing I had 12 weeks to do it.  I, motivated Carina, struggled like you wouldn’t believe those first few weeks.  My willpower started strong and drizzled away.  I started getting injuries, and was getting way too stressed out about the impending run.  I used all of the magical motivators I know of.

Struggling.

I was doing all of these amazing trail runs at my best effort with a rather ruthless mindset and coming back drained, sore, and unmotivated to go out for the next long run.

One day I was running down in our provincial park.  As I came through a thick forest, smacking branches out of the way, I stopped with my hear in my throat.  A HUGE creature stood up and looked right at me.

A FULL SIZED MOOSE.  Terrified, I ran as fast as I could in the other direction.  The feeling was mutual.  She ran away just as scared of me.

That very same run, a few minutes after my adrenals had recovered, I saw a gorgeous bald eagle soar overhead and land in a nearby tree.  I paused my GPS tracker and looked around.  I was running along this beautiful trail, rimmed with copses of birch trees, and my feet were cushioned by soft mossy ground.  It was spectacular.  The rest of that run was an easy, ambling adventure through Canadian forest.  I got the distance done but in a very slow time that wouldn’ t have met my standards at the start of the run.  I was too busy stopping and taking photos and simply enjoying the beauty of nature.  The funny thing is, at the end of that 12k run, I felt the best I have ever felt after a run. I felt profound grattitude, and a craving for more of whatever it was that just happened. 

The moment it all clicked.

The same day I did the same. I went in with an idea of my distance, but threw my time goals out of the window.  I decided to just see what I felt ilke doing.  You know what?  It gave me time to stop, absorb the moment I was in, and enjoy it.  It took my run from pain and suffering to immense enjoyment and immersion in nature. For the first time I was not stumbling on rocks because I was there, with the trail.  Instead of just running on it. I was out of my 100% perfectionist mindset inside of my head, listening to the GPS and relying on willpower.

Relying on the energy of the natural environment around me and enjoyment of the experience was a game changer.  The rest of those 12 weeks, I went into each run with this new mindset, this new perspective, and embraced the 70%.

 

THE 100% PERFECTIONIST MINDSET

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THE 70% RELAXED MINDSET

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And so, on September 21st, 2014 when I jumped out of a helicopter, onto the shores of a mountain lake, to run 21k DOWN a mountain, through the Canadian Rocky Mountain wilderness I was so ready for it.   I ripped through that run in a great time for someone who only trained at 70% and loved every moment of it.

With a 70% approach, I tapped into a deeper motivator than willpower. I was tapped into  the majesty of nature, the creation of memories.  The experience itself.  Being in the present moment.  The reason why people (including me) fall in love with trail running in the first place.  I almost lost it there, focusing on tech and time and benchmarks, but I found it one afternoon almost crashing into a moose!

 

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Baby Gear, Families in Calgary, Grounding, Lifestyle, Lifestyle Design, Nature, Nature and Forest Play, Physical Wellness

Reconnect with Nature on Maternity Leave x How to Practice Mindfulness in Nature.

Venturing back out into the worldwith your new baby(and reconnecting with nature)

A huge goal I had for myself on maternity leave was to get back outside and enjoy the natural world.  I drowned my Pinterest boards in beautiful images of happy women with their babies in carriers and backpacks.

I also curate my social media feeds, I only follow those whose lives I admire and aspire to.  To have images of nature based parenting scroll through my screen, is incredibly inspiring and I believe it acts on a subconscious level as well.  I joined Facebook groups as well, and there are many communities of brave mothers getting out there in nature with their kids, like Annika of Born to Be Adventurous, Family and Sally of Wholistic Health YYC, Tanya of Family Adventures in the Canadian Rockies – there are so many.  The beauty of Instagram too is you can find circles of people who are living the lives with their children that you’d like to, as well and they will 10000% support you! No overly concerned ladies here commenting on how it’s hot for your baby and should you really be hiking? dipping her in that cold water? etc etc.  (Yes I’ve had many well-meaning strangers approach me on adventures out, especially on snow days.)

Why was nature time with the kids such a draw for me? Getting outside has always been a form of meditation.  When I am out in nature, I reconnect with natural rhythms and the simple enjoyment of fresh air.  I come back recharged and feeling alive.  Somewhere in the great outdoors, I grind out anxiety and racing thoughts under my trail shoes.

In order to have a great maternity leave, I knew I would need to reconnect with nature somehow.

In the first few months of my winter-born’s life, I was, among other things, intimidated to do simple things like take her to the mall for the first time in the stroller, put her in the carrier for the first time, go out for my first winter walk (I do live in the Rocky Mountains of Canada, we are talking snow piles and biting winds!)  I went from brave and courageous to avoiding going out because I was putting off unfolding my stroller and putting my baby in a snowsuit for the first time.  The struggle really is real!

I am very happy to admit I HAD NOT, AT ALL expected this strange sense of intimidation and newness. Every activity, from the mundane to the complicated, would take a concerted effort.

Was it a lack of confidence?  Not necessarily.

I knew that both my daughter and I were freshly born into the world as new people.  Her a new human, I a new Mum.  Just as her eyes grew wide trying to take everything in, my eyes grew wide at the thought of bringing a floppy, fragile little creature with me on my former adventures.

As we slowly began to venture out in the world, it made me laugh.  I was VERY intimidated using the Bob Stroller for the first time and had to watch youtube over, and over, and over to figure out how to unfold it and put it in my car… but it was all new to her, too. The first time a dandelion blew apart in the wind ? MIND BLOWN.  Bird song? CAN’T EVEN.

When I started noticing the profound appreciation in her face for every tiny moment or whisper of a sound, I knew I’d be shifting the scale of my outings.   I, too, began to profoundly appreciate tiny things.   Ladybirds in the grass, dragonflies buzzing by us.  The fresh smell of crisp autumn air.  A sunset setting the mountains on fire.  Tiny things.  Instead of focusing on the vista of the mountains, my focus narrowed to leaves on the ground, frost covered twigs on the tree and snowflakes falling on the stroller, outlining their crystalline shape.

Have you ever been walking through your city and you get stuck behind tourists gawking at the buildings, or scenery?  It’s sort of the same when you are with a little human. EVERYTHING. SO. AMAZING. MUST. PHOTO. CANNOT. HANDLE.

The key to a brilliant maternity leave is scaling your outdoor activities down, way down, we’re talking to the scale of a baby – or a toddler.  You’ve got your whole life to scale back up, but for now, scale small and watch how nature takes you in.

This the essence of a “micro adventure.”

Smaller scale, commitment, duration, scale.

This does not mean smaller rewards.

I have found profound happiness in our little adventures every day. The scaled down adventure leads to closer inspection and appreciation of the world in our path. Rather than planning a huge day out once in a while when the stars are aligned (the parents are prepared and the children are happy,) I get out in nature, reconnect and rebalance in very simple ways.

You’ve got your whole life to grow up and grow back outward into nature.  Why not join with your little one and get down to their scale, and grow with them.

Get out there in the fresh air, take in the world through the eyes of your baby and prepare to be awed. Nature has some treats for you, too.

 

xo